Laboratory Genetic Counselor Q+A ((By Jade M.))

mad-science

A day in the lab.

I wanted to write a post about life as a lab counselor, but I wasn’t making much progress.  Luckily, Sarah posed some questions to help get the wheels spinning!

A little background: I work remotely as a report writer for cardiology testing and have been in this position for about 8 months.
Would you make the transition again?

Yes! However, I was always drawn to a laboratory position.
During graduate school, we had a laboratory counselor speak to us about her job – I loved the idea of flexibility in your work schedule along with the option to work remotely. Apart from these perks, I was always academically fascinated by the molecular aspect of genetic counseling and how the gene/protein level corresponded to the outward phenotype.  Combine this with a love for writing and research – and lab counseling was a perfect fit for me.
Is it more stressful or less stressful?

Much less stressful. However, I came from a busy clinic where we were short a genetic counselor for 50% of my employment. Furthermore, I had to navigate the stickiness of insurance authorization for commercial and medicaid providers – I do not miss that.

Do you spend more hours working or fewer?

Fewer.  But I was working a lot at my previous job.  Like, a lot. The whole crew was, so it’s not like I over-carried the burden.  But if I didn’t start working fewer hours, I would have all gray hair by now.

If you were to give advice to a senior GC student, would you recommend first taking a clinical position or do you wish you would have gone straight into working for a lab?
I would absolutely recommend working in a clinic first.  My thought is that if you want to be a great lab counselor, you need to put your brain through GC training camp.  You need to work out your clinical muscles and tone up your patient-centered thinking.  You need to do some heavy lifting in clinical note-writing and strengthen your core in clinical diagnoses.  You need to bench-press empathy and take a long, slow run through family histories.  Are you nervous that this explanation is becoming way too cross-fitty?
In other words: when you work in a laboratory, you tend to switch your brain to the molecular side of things.  But I am far better at variant interpretation when I call upon my clinical skills – for instance (1) how to read physician notes (2) how syndromes/conditions are identified clinically (3) how a variant call will affect a person/family (4) bearing in mind the “fight” the GC undertook for insurance authorization or the burden the family incurs for paying more than they can afford (5) recognizing the impact of turnaround times (6) feeling confident that I can speak to GCs/doctors who call with question from the clinic, because, hey, I’ve been there.

Best perk of the job?

No more “Sunday night blues.”  My Sundays are full, happy, beautiful days.  As opposed to the previous 3pm anxiety onset when you realize you have to do yet another workweek.
Also, I don’t have to run into people on the elevator who say stupid things like “Happy Humpday.”
Least favorite job duty?

I love reading scientific articles and digging deep into literature.  But sometimes, ugh.
Did anything surprise you about your new lab position?

I am surprised how transparent we are.  For instance, I assumed laboratories hid their classification calls and supporting evidence.  It’s quite the opposite – we upload all of our calls to ClinVar and make an effort to root out any inconsistencies with other labs.  This is excellent for patient care.

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2 thoughts on “Laboratory Genetic Counselor Q+A ((By Jade M.))

  1. moriahkeiko says:

    I love this blog. I love that there are so many contributors–I always learn something new! I am an undergrad aspiring to become a genetic counselor. Since grad school is still a while away, I sometimes reconsider my choice. But then a great and informative post like this pops up, and I’m inspired all over again! Thank you!

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