Category Archives: life in graduate school

It is NEVER too late to become a GC.

Hello dear readers.  All of us here at Maps & Genes are very excited to bring you this fantastic post– I hope you enjoy the inspiration from our esteemded colleague panel as much as we did!

1. How did you decide to make a career move?

Genetic counseling was my career choice when I was an undergrad student over 30 years ago, however my life went in a different direction.  Instead, I worked in research and academia.  Additionally, for 10 years I was a “stay at home mom”.  As my children got older, I began reconsidering my career.

I have always considered myself a lifelong learner. The first step in my decision to change careers was realizing that although I had many years before retirement, there were no further growth or leadership opportunities on my current path. The second step involved a long reflective period in which I inventoried my dreams, skill set, strengths, challenges and barriers.  The dream of becoming a genetic counselor resurfaced during this period.  I researched the career and decided it was a perfect fit.  The third step was addressing the challenges and barriers, namely cost and being decades removed from a higher education environment (not to mention the field changed dramatically in that time period).  I established a plan to pay for tuition and enrolled in classes to update my knowledge. The final step was the hardest:  taking a deep breath and jumping away from the comfort zone.

I had always had an interest in human anatomy, biology and medicine and intended for a career in this area when I first went to college. But, I lost my way and stumbled out of my major in biology into other majors. I also fell into a different career, which was exciting in my younger years, but I knew it wouldn’t remain a stable career so I began to think about going back to school for my original interest.

My story is a bit complicated. I completed a B.S. in Biology and M.A. in Biology, after which I taught middle/high school and community college biology courses for several years. I then made my first career switch and worked as a financial planner for almost five years. I found that to be unfulfilling and decided to go to graduate school to pursue a PhD in Genetics, with the intention of pursuing an academic career. When I learned more about genetic counseling, I felt that it would be a better fit for me, since it would allow me to spend more time working directly with patients. Rather than spending most of my time behind the scenes doing basic research and teaching undergraduates, I decided I wanted to apply my research and teaching skills in a different way. The fact that genetic counselors have the opportunity to pursue a variety of different types of positions is also very intriguing to me.

2. How did it feel being a GC student?

  It was exciting, terrifying and exhausting! I literally got goosebumps while sitting in lectures and hearing about the advancements in this field. However, I wouldn’t be honest if I didn’t admit to doubting myself occasionally. In those moments, I remembered the mantra of a famous, blue fish, “Just keep swimming”.

There are days where it feels weird sometimes because I am one of the oldest students amongst several young women. But then there are also days where I do not feel the age difference at all, but instead just see fellow classmates that I am on this journey together. There is also a humbling effect of being in school again after having a previous career.

I am really enjoying being a GC student because there is so much interesting information to learn!  I am especially enjoying my rotations, particularly my interactions with established genetic counselors, who have all been wonderful teachers.

3. What are your tips for the GC program interview process?

I sincerely believe your age and life experiences are assets, don’t downplay them.  However, you will also have your own unique challenges.  Know what they are.  Determine how you will or have addressed them. Finally, GC training programs are very competitive. If you are not accepted the first time you apply, don’t give up.  Apply again.

Be presentable, dress appropriately, maintain professional composure, take notes, and do not ask the current students questions about other schools’ interview process.

I would say that you should emphasize what draws you to the field of genetic counseling and why you believe you would be a good GC. Everyone who is being interviewed has already shown that they have the qualifications on paper, so you don’t need to prove that you have those. Show the programs that are interviewing you that you are passionate, professional, and willing to put in the work.

4. Do you have any Grad school survival recommendations?

Be open to new ideas and new ways of doing things.  Take one day at a time. Decide to learn from your younger classmates, they have a lot to teach you. Take care of yourself.  Embrace the experience and remember you are living a dream.

Be proactive and do not wait until the last minute. Be detail oriented, responsible and mature.

Lean on your classmates for support. They will be an invaluable resources in helping you get through your program. Even if you are at different stages in your life, you will find that you have more in common than you think. Make sure you stay organized and try to keep up with the work.

5. Would you do it all over again?

Absolutely!

Yes! Completing the GC training program was the biggest metaphorical mountain I’ve climbed.  I had a great group of classmates who helped me reach the top. It is a challenge worth taking

Definitely — deciding to apply to a genetic counseling program has been a wonderful decision so far.

6. What advice would you give a person who is just thinking about a second career as a GC?

Making this change is undoubtedly one of the bigger decisions in your life.  It will affect you and your family. You may consider waiting until the timing is better, until you are more prepared, etc. However, there likely will not be a time when all the circumstances are perfect.  I think the final analysis boils down to your willingness and ability to be move away from what is known and comfortable. Growth lies outside the comfort zone.

Conduct an informational interview with a practicing GC. Do the research, get as much exposure as you can before you make the decision. You have to make sure you are fully informed of what you are getting yourself into.

I think it is very important to think about your motivations and why you are changing careers. What are you looking to get out of the career? Do the requirements of the job match your personality? Will genetic counseling provide you with what your old career did not? For me, this was a great decision, but for you, things might be different. A graduate program is an investment, and a career change is a major decision, so I would recommend putting a lot of thought into it and speaking with at least one working genetic counselor to see if you think the job might be right for you.

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Before You Say “Yes” to Your First Job ((by Sarah))

Dear second year GC students, this one is for you!

You get your first job offer.  Or with the way the genetic counseling profession is going, you get multiple job offers.  You are ecstatic.  You landed the dream job and are using your degrees.   Success.  A stressful week or more of deliberations and debates. [take your time, ball is in your court!]  You accept.  This time is much like a new relationship.  Rose colored glasses are on and you are are being wooed.

Several months into the relationship, much of the excitement wears off.  And you are left with what you negotiated.  For many it all works out well, which it did for me and my GC friends.  But there are a few things I wish I would have known.

  • ALWAYS negotiate.  It does not hurt to ask.  Have a plan, or very specific things you want to ask for.  Have concrete reasons why your employer should include the things you ask for in your offer.  (i.e. Asking for a higher starting salary because you already have experience working with cancer patients before and during graduate school, and have developed a unique skill set)   If you have not read it yet, try the book Lean InKeep in mind that the ball is in your court.  You have the job offer.  They are not (likely) going to suddenly take that away, they already have decided they want you.

My biggest job negotiation surprise:  I had a plan (like most of my fellow OCD… or should I say “detail oriented” GCs).  I knew the salary range I wanted.  I knew the benefits I wanted.  But when it came down to it, I didn’t know what to say.  I had done a lot of reading and I knew it was key to always ask for a bit more, just to see.  I knew that it was also key to start at a salary that was a good level, because all future raises, etc would be based off this starting amount.  I have had two jobs since graduation.  For each, I asked for a bit more above base salary offer.  I was told “This is the level we start all newly hired genetic counselors at.  We are unable to negotiate this.”  Each time, it was a surprise.  This is not something they seem to warn you about in job hunting books or blogs. For job two, I even sent my sweet HR lady to double check- just to be sure this was their final answer-  I did have additional career experience now.  In the end, the answer was still a no.  But hey… still never hurt to ask!   

  • Get it in WRITING.  This is what I (almost) learned that hard way.  And what one of my dear friends did learn the hard way.  This is where the rose-colored glasses came in for me.  You think you did a great job.  You love the salary.  You were able to negotiate a signing bonus.  Benefits look good.  Your new employer will cover the cost of the boards review course, board certification exams (pending you pass), per-approved CEU’s, and one conference per year with travel costs.  But do you have the proof?

Fast forward about one year into job number two.  I find a conference I am dying to attend.  ((For cancer GC’s or students with a love of cancer genetic counseling, the buzz in GC world is that this is an amazing, one of a kind opportunity.))  Well, several exciting leadership changes and one boss change later, I hear the dreaded words, “well, we will see if it is approved.  I am not sure, budgets are really tight.”  In my head, I nearly implode.  No.  I negotiated this.  This is my one conference.  I really need to attend and learn.  Hello, I mostly see breast cancer patients and its all about BRCA!  Outwardly, I calmly inform my delightful new boss that I had negotiated one conference of my choice per year.  Doing her job, she let me know: “Well, we will see if I can find that in your contract, but I do not recall it being there.”  Turns out, many contracts are very generic.  I had my salary, insurance, retirement, and the other common job benefits clearly documented.  But all the other, more genetic counselor specific things were not.  Myself and my former boss had talked though all the special GC benefits in person and via phone.  I did not even have one single email about conferences, boards, or CEU’s.  In the end, my old boss came through.  I am fortunate to have/have had wonderful bosses.  Canada here I come, but lesson learned!

  • Taxes Suck.  While this is not a surprise, for some reason I did not think about this when negotiating my signing/relocation bonus.   Myself and my now-husband had a big move and we were still going to be paying rent on our apartment that we left before our lease was over.  So, I (clearly not thinking), asked for a specific amount that would help ease the transition.  When the check arrived, it was much less than anticipated.   Taxes took away a good chunk.  I quickly realized I would have asked for just a bit more if I had to do it all over again.
  • The PSS is the Negotiating Bible.  If you are not even sure where to start, the PSS is for you.  The PSS or professional satisfaction survey is amazing, and genetic counseling specific.  It is put out for NSGC members.  Before you go to your job interviews, get familiar with this.  Know average benefits people have.  Know what kinds of salary to expect from your geographic region and for your experience level.  Keep in mind that salary varies greatly state to state, or even city to city.  If you are not tied to a specific geographic region, you may want to keep this in mind if student loans are large.

Happy job hunting!

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Today is the day!

Today marks the start of the decision period for Genetic Counseling programs and GC applicants.  We all wish you the best of luck today and throughout the remainder of the week!

Hope things are going smoothly– or at the very least you are taking steps to stay sane through this process.  Here are three last words of wisdom for you all:

1. Do not give up on your dreams.

Will get in

2. Take time from your day to do something fun.  Take a break– go to dinner– get some ice cream– anything to take your mind off a crazy day ((or to CELEBRATE a crazy day)).

3. Make the best decision for YOU.  Only you know how you truly feel– follow your gut instincts.

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3 things professional 20 somethings should be doing ((by Sarah)).

For all you new or prospective GCs out there… Here are a few tidbits I am ((slowly)) learning about professional life…

My Must Haves:

1. A well-curated LinkedIn.

From professional networking to finding future jobs– you should get a LinkedIn stat if you do not currently have one.  And– keep it up to date! You never know who may see it! ((I have had several companies email me about potential jobs via LinkedIn too!))

2. A proper email AND twitter.

A proper email may seem obvious– but is important to note.  By proper email– think a professional email account free of any hobbies/interests/etc ((ie. “cheer_girl_fo_life@” or “girl_crazy_soccer_stud@” require an upgrad)).  Likely stick with some form of your name.

Now a professional twitter is something I have been thoroughly enjoying//had not thought about much before.  I now have GC friends who I primarily if not exclusively know via twitter.  It is an amazing way to keep up with new occurrences in your field as well.  ((Always be thinking about networking!))

3. Keep that CV updated. ((And references list!))

Whenever you do something new– update that CV right away so you are never caught unprepared.  This also goes for those young professionals who are already employed– you never know when someone may ask for a copy!  ((Thanks to my NSGC mentor for this tip!))

When thinking professional references– build a diverse list of 3-5 complete with emails, phone numbers, and work addresses.

Best of luck!

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And just when you thought it was almost over… ((by austin))

Hi everyone! I’ve been brainstorming what to tackle for my first blog post, and I’ve come to the conclusion that my mantra this year has thus far been: And just when you thought it was over…

From what I had heard from previous students, your second year was much easier than the first. Now don’t get me wrong – they’re totally right (although this is, of course, subjective). I think I may have just taken more than a little liberty into interpreting what ‘easier’ meant, which is perhaps my expectations for this year were so off the mark.

The first year of the program (our program anyway) is very coursework-heavy. Lots of presentations, tests, studying until the wee hours of the morning, all that fun stuff. I personally found it to be quite challenging, but am continually surprised at how much one can actually learn in nine short months. I went into my second year with (perhaps unreasonable) expectations that it was smooth sailing until May. I hate to tell ya folks, but it ain’t happenin.

Group projects and 3 hour tests have morphed into research for clinical rotations and a thesis project (gasp!). It has been a good change of pace, and it really is a much more manageable workload. I would just make sure not to subscribe to the procrastinator’s club (like I seem to have unwittingly done at some point during the summer).

From my perspective, this shift has been a helpful progression into the final stretch of our training. Being able to be more focused on clinic rotations, where we’re getting more of the (in my opinion) most valuable part of the training, has really helped to visualize what it is going to be like traversing the waters of genetic counseling as an actual genetic counselor rather than an overly eager student. You also get to take part in more of the nitty gritty things (chart notes, following up on tests, etc.) that you don’t usually see that much in the first year, which is helpful to get a full picture of what a potential job may look like.

The thesis project is daunting, mostly because of its vast nature. You get to spend about a year working very closely on a topic you pick and are (hopefully) passionate about. With that comes the very real chance to be able to contribute something outstanding to the profession at such an early stage of one’s career, which is an amazing opportunity. Just choose your topic wisely, because you’ll be spending more time with it than your friends and family combined.

Despite how this post started, I feel I should clarify that I’m not upset and I shouldn’t be surprised. The fact that I was shocked by how busy the second year is was based more on my wishful interpretation that in the second year all you had to do is go to clinic. Again, nobody told me that – I just seemed to have worked it out in my head that way (blatant continual misinterpretation – it’s a gift!). The pace and the work this year has been a much-needed reprieve from the intensity of the first year, but it’s still challenging. Just in a much different way. And two years of pushing yourself to take the most that you can away from this experience is hopefully what we all signed up for.

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3 Things They Don’t Tell You About Becoming a Genetic Counselor ((by Sarah))

1.  You will never go anywhere… ever again… without thinking multiple people have some sort of genetic condition.  It is sad but so true.  That tall skinny man in front of you in the grocery store undoubtably has Marfan syndrome while the baby you pass in the parking lot clearly is macrocephalic.  (or having a head size two standard deviations above the mean, or average, for his size)

Macrocephaly

 Even gas stations are not safe.  I drove by this one the other day!  Does this make anyone else think Long QT syndrome?

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2.  You get overly excited whenever you discover a new genetics-related website or app.  And no, your significant other/parents do not want to hear how excited you are about your new pregnancy wheel app.    Here are a few of my favorite new discoveries!

–  CyDasA tool for drawing karyograms/ideograms.  If there is a patient with multiple duplications, deletions, or translocations and you always wished you knew what it looked like/how big the genetic changes were… then this is the site for you!  I am a big proponent of visual aids so this was an amazing site for me to utilize.  Great for making visual aids for patients! (Note: With some finesse, you can move the X chromosome down next to the Y)  Below is their example.

Karyogram

 46,y,-7,+8,t(9;22)(q341;q112),i(17)(q10),+der(22)t(9;22) 

–  Next Gx DxWe like to call this the Kayak of genetic testing.  It is a user-friendly resource to determine labs offering specific genetic tests along with their costs, specifications, and shipping details.  However, we had found a few errors regarding test cost in the past.  When in doubt, just be grateful GeneTests is back!  This is always a good place to start if you are unsure where to find genetic testing availability and information.

 –  The Pregnancy Wheel App by Duprey Net – A must for anyone in the prenatal world.  Much to my dismay it is not free.  While it only cost a whopping $0.99, I still just hate purchasing apps. This one was worth every cent since it did not lose the “pregnancy wheel” feel.

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CFTR2 — If you are curious about any kind of Cystic Fibrosis mutation or you have a patient with a mutation that is unusual – This is the place for you to go!  There are over 1,800 different mutations in the CFTR gene known thus far.  Therefore, this is a site to bookmark for future use!  There is also another, similar website out of Canada called the Cystic Fibrosis Mutation Database that has excellent visuals of the CFTR gene and mutation information.  The mutation data from this website has now been combined with the CFTR2 site.  Therefore, if you are looking for a more, “one-stop shopping” experience, CFTR2 is for you!

CFTR

The DNA Exchange If you are enjoying this blog and want to read more postings from other genetic counselors or genetics professionals, take a look at this blog!  Especially if you are curious and wish to know more about hot topics in the genetic counseling field.

3.    You will likely have to explain what your career is over and over again to everyone you come into contact with.  I absolutely love my profession so I don’t mind this too much.  I walk around spreading the word about genetic counseling just about everyday.  You will also come up with a few, easy to explain examples to tell people about when they ask “exactly what will you do??”  However, the Angelina Jolie Effect definitely created more awareness for our field.  ((Even though we all will not be working with women at risk for cancer… Angelina Jolie surely had an impact in the genetics field)).  I will admit though, some days having one simple word like “nurse” to describe my career would be easier!

There are also so many misconceptions still out there.  No, we are NOT making “designer babies” or telling people how to create a perfect human race.  Unfortunately, people who think these things clearly have little understanding of what GCs do and how we work to support patients to make educated, autonomous decisions.  Often what people may say sounds a bit more like a mix between a history book from several decades ago and a sci-fi novel than what I will be doing at my 9-5 job.  This is just one of those things you will face as you enter the field of genetics from any angle.

This is a new, rapidly changing field that is truly on the cutting edge so it is understandable that not everyone knows what it is that GCs do.  More and more, people are starting to know what genetic counselors are, which is both hopeful and exciting.  This is ((one of the many reasons)) why the future is looking so bright for GCs!  And to many of our readers… you too could be/will be apart of this exciting field!

Career and Passion

To the next two years…and BEYOND! ((by melissa))

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After almost completing the first week of my official Genetic Counseling education, I can’t stop myself from thinking about all the accomplishments to be had in the next two years of life.   This may be nerd status, but, regardless of all the readings, presentations, exams, quizzes, (insert more school-related “to-do” items), the overwhelming feelings I am experiencing are from pure excitement.  (If everything goes according to plan) I will become a Genetic Counselor in two years.  My pursuit of the profession is HOT.

Which also brings me to the question of…”why am I in pursuit of this profession?”  We recently had a class discussion of, likely, the most difficult question we have been asked…”What is a Genetic Counselor?” (or any other version of the sort.)  Most of us want to respond with…”well, do you have a few minutes?”  To us, a brief description does not serve enough justice for something we are all striving to become.

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Since Genetic Counseling is a multi-faceted profession, I believe there are different aspects that attracted each of us.  Personally, I am attracted to the magical blend of psychosocial support and transfer of medical knowledge, or more essentially communicating and delivering important information without neglecting that the receiving end of this information is a human and has a perception of feelings.  With this, it is difficult to refer to the role of the counselor in terms of one stoic job.  Each individual is unique and quite literally the only version of themselves (as evidenced at the DNA level!) and their feelings and reactions are far from being predicted.  In counseling sessions of two seemingly identical cases, the counselor role can range from support system to fact deliverer.

It is this vast role of a Genetic Counselor that adds to the difficulty of producing a sufficient answer to what we are.  I advise that if you were to Google this question, please delve deeper than just the surface display of responses given (I’m sorry, “web defintion”, but we are much more than “guidance for prospective parents on the likelihood of genetic disorders in their future children” – we tackle pediatrics and adult specialties as well!)   Although I’m partial to NSGC, or National Society of Genetic Counselors, their website provides an excellent description of the profession and beyond here.  Take time and check out the rest of the website, as well, because there are more great things to observe (like press releases under the “Media” tab – nerd status again!)

Are you in pursuit of a Genetic Counseling degree or considering the profession?  What is it that has caught your interest?  We love hearing about other individuals’ passions, no matter what they are (even if they aren’t centered around Genetic Counseling!)

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Congratulations to the C/O 2013

I have been very fortunate to have made so many  friends throughout the graduate school experience and to have created connections with students in different programs.  So glad to have met all of you!

It doesn’t take a scientist (although I am one, actually a Master one) to notice all the graduation ceremonies popping up on Facebook.  So while we all  “hood up” and celebrate our accomplishments, Maps & Genes wants to extend a “Congratulations!” to all of us, including the First Years becoming Second Years and the NEW First Years who were recently accepted.

I (Jade) also have  to post a “We Did It!” photo of my classmates and I on Graduation Day!

USC Genetic Counseling C/O 2013

Coming Up: Perhaps some reflection posts (although we might be too tired to reflect, so no promises), and also a “What’s Next for m&g” post!

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Genetic Counseling Thesis: An Interview with Olivia ((Interviewed by Jade))

Tweeted... document from X-Men: Days of Future Past (Copyright: Twitter/@bryansinger)

Tweeted… document from X-Men: Days of Future Past (Copyright: Twitter/@bryansinger)

A whole lotta blood, sweat, and tears goes into graduate school, but, to a certain extent, the workload is relatable.  We have been accustomed to exams for ages now.  We know how to work a library. We are not afraid of extracurricular opportunities, and even PubMed searches are becoming like an old friend.
However, at least for those of us earning our first master’s degree, Thesis is uncharted territory. It is not required by all GC programs, but it is by most, and finished projects range from 50 to well over 100 pages of scientific goodstuff. I decided to interview Olivia to provide some insight into the process, as well as a better understanding of the immense amount of work and re-work that the project demands.
1. Olivia, summarize your thesis in 3 sentences or less.
Fertility technologies such as sperm, oocyte, or embryo cryopreservation have recently been applied to assist cancer patients at risk of infertility due to cancer treatment or for gene positive individuals for whom removal of reproductive organs is indicated (think: BRCA carriers).  Because genetic counselors often see patients who are of reproductive age who may be candidates for these procedures, termed fertility preservation, I surveyed counselors for their interest and education needs regarding this topic. Overall, counselors were open to incorporating this subject into their sessions and wanted to learn more so they can be prepared to help guide an interested patient.
2. Why did this topic interest you?
 I really am intrigued by the application of new technology in the clinical setting. I used to work in a translational lab where the goal was to carry bench science findings into  eventual development as drug therapies for cancer patients and the curiosity has continued!
3. Were your results significant/What was learned?
Oncofertility is entering the realm of treatment and management of cancer care, the oncologist’s zone usually, so I wasn’t sure how open counselors would be to incorporating this discussion into their sessions. However, they were incredibly curious and eager to learn more, especially regarding subtopics that would help them identify who was most at risk and where to find resources. Developing an educational tool for any counselor to access when needed would be the next step in the project but it would also be interesting to hear the patient’s perspectives as well.
4. What part of thesis-writing made you want to pull your hair out?
I think thesis is difficult because it requires that you are aware of not only details (citations, making coherent sentences) but that you don’t lose sight of the big picture (goal of the thesis/hypothesis, take home message). It can be tiring zooming in and out again. Plus, it’s like a marathon. I don’t think I’ve ever worked on a project that long, ever.
5. What part of thesis-writing made you think maybe it was worth pulling your hair out?
 It felt really great to hear the responses to my survey and to my final paper. I’m a newbie to the field but I really am eager to show that I can contribute in some small way. It was a great introduction to research and to professional issues.  I look forward to continuing this project and doing a pilot of an educational tool in the (near) future.
6.  Impart some words of wisdom for future thesis writers.
 Be dedicated and try not to be discouraged. Set a writing schedule and a no-writing schedule (aka time to recharge) and STICK TO IT. Also, get someone who knows stats programs really well and become best friends.
Get more info here and here and, hey, here, here, here.  {These links provide examples of past student works from different programs.}
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Guest Post: How to Get Into (and Thrive in) Genetic Counseling Graduate Programs ((By Sarah))

The following is a guest post by a First-Year in my (Jade) program.  We’re glad to hear from you, Sarah —  take it away:

 

Graduate School.  Sounded intimidating.  Sounded like something that would be impossible to get into and that would then consume my life.

Well, that is what I thought when I was going through the application process anyway.  After numerous applications (I applied to 8 schools) and interviews (I chose to interview at 4), I remember feeling like I would never get accepted.  And, after reading the student biographies some schools posted (including my own) I was CONVINCED I would not get in.   However, I made it, and I am so glad that I did.

 

So, how do you get in?  That is the question I am sure every student applying would love to have answered.  Here are 3 tips you might find helpful:

 

  1. Be Genuine.  It is important for you to be who you are.   And, you will be happier in your program if you are.  Every program has its differences and similarities.  You want a program that fits who you are.  I knew I wanted to be able to relate to people well, so a strong psychosocial aspect was key for me.  But it’s not for everyone and you will “feel that out” through the interview process.  And of course, make sure who you are is reflected in your application.

 

  1.  Dress the Part.  This may sound less-important, but allow me to explain.  Graduate schools want someone who is serious about being a Genetic Counselor, which is why it is crucial to demonstrate your professionalism through appearance.  First impressions are crucial, and your attire is part of that first impression.  So, dress professionally [blazer/jacket + skirt/dress pants].  Dressing the part makes you look like you really want a place in a program.  Also, I would recommend a portfolio, so you can take notes, or write down questions to review for yourself pre-interview.  This will also help your feel more prepared and organized.

 

dress

Sarah’s Interview Picks: Long skirt at least to the knee, shoes with low heels, simple bag and minimal jewelry, shirt with a non-revealing neckline, and a professional blazer.  Remember, if you wear a watch, do not keep peering down at it during your interview – you do not want to appear bored or uninterested!

 

3. Prepare a LOT OF QUESTIONS.  Nothing was more difficult than running out of questions to the question: What questions do you have for us?  Particularly since you’re trying not to ask every interviewer the same questions.  You need to get as much information as you can, so prepare a variety of questions that also reflect the specific program.

 

My favorite question:

How did you get into this profession?

 

Another helpful tip:

If you meet anyone you love, or really “hit it off” with while at an interview, GET HIS OR HER CONTACT INFO!  I am currently roommates with one of the girls I met, only once, at our interview.  She was able to remember my name and find me online.  And, of course, it is GREAT to know someone when you move 14 hours away from home to a strange place and find yourself having to make friends all over again!

 

Recommended Undergraduate Experiences: 

  1. Anything in a healthcare setting (including volunteer work!)
  2. Any laboratory experiences ( biology or psychology are very helpful)
  3. If available, consider taking these courses: developmental biology, embryology, any classes related to cancer, cell biology, and an array of psychology courses [in addition to your prerequisites… of course]

 

Best of luck in your application journey!

-Sarah

 

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